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WHF Policy conference: Funding, welfare, inclusivity, recruitment, and meeting future healthcare demand

Westminster Health Forum policy conference

Key issues for the health workforce and priorities going forward – funding, welfare, inclusivity, recruitment, and meeting future healthcare demand

Morning, Wednesday, 12th January 2022


Book Online | Live Agenda |

with
Dr Sanjiv Ahluwalia, Regional Postgraduate Dean, NHS Health Education London; and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor, University College London Medical School

Alastair Henderson, Chief Executive, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges

Dr Vivienne Lyfar-Cissé, Chair, NHS BME Network

Dr Jenny Vaughan, Chair, The Doctors Association

Lucy Warner, Chief Executive, NHS Practitioner Health Programme
and
John Barwick, Health and Care Professions Council; Tracey Budding, Royal College of Nursing; Anita Charlesworth, The Health Foundation; Dr Richard Fieldhouse, National Association of Sessional GPs; Candace Miller, Skills for Health; Dr Andrew Tresidder, Somerset Clinical Commissioning Group and NHS Practitioner Health; Luella Trickett, Association of British Healthcare Industries; and Professor Chris Warwick, NHS Health Education South East

Chaired by:

Baroness Thornton, Shadow Spokesperson for Health

This conference will be an opportunity to discuss key issues for the health workforce and policy priorities going forward for tackling critical challenges facing the NHS, especially in recovery from the pandemic.

The discussion will look at how best to support workforce mental health and take forward approaches to tackling burnout as well as priorities for the provision of workforce support and funding in the continued response to the pandemic and addressing the elective care backlog.

Delegates will also consider opportunities for improving inclusivity, pay, and professional development alongside key actions required to drive progress and for long-term strategic workforce planning. We also expect discussion on priorities for recruitment and retention as well as for delivering the skills, training, and capacity for innovative healthcare and meeting future demand.

The conference will examine workforce priorities in the context of recent developments, including:

  1. NHS funding – following announcements in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review, including the health and social care levy, as well as the growth of the NHS budget
  2. workforce strategic planning – as the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care announces an elective care delivery plan on workforce planning by the end of November and the development of a 15-year long-term plan for the health workforce expected next spring
  3. mental health support and funding – with the NHS recently funding an additional £15m to support the health and social care workforce during the pandemic
  4. the NHS People Plan – which includes commitments to supporting the wellbeing of the workforce, tackling discrimination, and driving recruitment and retention
  5. the Health and Care Bill – aiming to reduce the bureaucratic burden on the health workforce and support integration across health and care

We are pleased to be able to include keynote contributions from Dr Sanjiv Ahluwalia, Regional Postgraduate Dean, NHS Health Education London; and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor, University College London Medical School; Alastair Henderson, Chief Executive, Academy of Medical Royal College; Dr Vivienne Lyfar-Cissé, Chair, NHS BME Network; Dr Jenny Vaughan, Chair, The Doctors Association; and Lucy Warner, Chief Executive, NHS Practitioner Health Programme.

Key areas for discussion:

Priorities for supporting the health workforce in the recovery from the pandemic

  1. funding and support – looking at what is needed to:
    1. expand capacity to respond to the pandemic and for recovery
    2. continue to deliver the vaccination programme
    3. tackle NHS waiting times and address the elective care backlog
  2. COVID-19 – looking at the approaches taken to support workforce mental health through the ongoing pandemic and ways that these can be taken forward
  3. support in the workplace – exploring opportunities for flexible working patterns, supporting vulnerable staff, and the role of wellbeing guardians
  4. healthy attitudes to work – priorities for enabling staff to utilise their annual leave and have sufficient time to rest as well as ensuring occupational health and wellbeing support is available
  5. bureaucratic burden – looking at options for tackling bureaucratic processes and how this can free up more time for the workforce
  6. burnout – priorities for addressing burnout and understanding the impact this can have on services if it continues, including discussion on the recommendations from the Health and Social Care Select Committee

Driving recruitment and retention

  1. impact of the pandemic:
    1. looking at the ‘Nightingale effect’ and how the pandemic has encouraged people to support the NHS
    2. assessing how the pandemic has affected retention, morale, and culture, with people leaving the sector due to increased pressures
  1. the workforce at a local level:
    1. priorities for addressing workforce supply with plans for recruitment and retention
    2. assessing the impact of grants to support specific sectors where there is a workforce shortfall, including cancer and mental health nursing
    3. evaluating the role of locum and agency staff in meeting short-term workforce demands
  2. training and the student workforce:
    1. looking at the role of national recruitment campaigns and priorities for attracting people to join the health workforce
    2. priorities for supporting people to finish their training and placements and how this can be built into workforce plans
    3. examining the role of technology-enhanced or remote learning and professional development, and what is needed for training to support the workforce to engage with remote healthcare and technology
  3. recruitment – how to enable recruitment to keep pace with demand across all sectors of healthcare and the NHS to recruit staff in the specialities it needs to deliver high-quality and safe care

Improving inclusivity

  1. gender – addressing the gender pay gap and looking at priorities for responding to the recommendations from the Mend the Gap review
  2. ethnicity:
    1. priorities for tackling ethnic minority inequalities in the workforce and looking at how the pandemic has highlighted these challenges
    2. assessing what is needed to ensure individuals feel safe and protected, with ethnic minority doctors more likely to experience harassment and bullying
  3. referrals – exploring how best to tackle inequality in referrals, with evidence showing that ethnic minority doctors are twice as likely to receive complaints and referrals to the GMC

Encouraging innovation and new ways of working

  1. integrated care – priorities for supporting the workforce to work collaboratively and deliver integrated care as part of the NHS Long Term Plan, and how this aligns with the Health and Care Bill
  2. leadership – looking at what skills and training are required to:
    1. deliver effective leadership and system working
    2. drive forward a culture which promotes staff development, workforce retention, and patient safety
  3. innovation – building on the innovative and collaborative work that was developed during the pandemic and exploring opportunities for:
    1. supporting the workforce with the uptake of innovative methods
    2. improving the uptake of digital technologies to enable workforce efficiencies
    3. utilising innovation and data to improve service planning and delivery

Securing workforce capacity for future healthcare demands and delivering long-term ambitions

  1. sustainability – assessing what is required to develop a sustainable workforce for the future
  2. capacity – looking at:
    1. the funding and long-term recruitment processes needed to meet the capacity of future healthcare demand
    2. strategic priorities for the upcoming 15-year long-term plan for the health workforce and what is required to deliver the plan effectively
  3. the NHS Long Term Plan next steps for supporting the workforce to deliver the ambitions for health and care set out in the Plan

Relevant developments:

  1. Workforce burnout and resilience in the NHS and social care the second report from the Health and Social Care Select Committee inquiry, which looks at burnout and workforce planning and sets out recommendations for improvement going forward
  2. the NHS People Plan – published last year, the plan includes commitments to support workforce wellbeing, tackle discrimination, drive recruitment and retention, and support skills development and new methods of care delivery
  3. the NHS Long Term Plan – including actions to grow and support the workforce, with measures aimed at developing a more supportive culture, shaping new NHS roles to reflect future needs, and offering improved development opportunities
  4. the Health and Care Bill – looking to reduce bureaucracy to help the workforce and support integration across health and care, outlining greater accountability and responsibility for workforce planning as a key intention
  5. NHS strengthens mental health support for staff – providing £15m towards expanded mental health services for the health workforce during the pandemic
  6. We are the NHS – the recruitment drive launched to build on the ‘Nightingale effect’, which saw increased applications to nursing positions and training programmes following the pandemic
  7. Medical Workforce Race Equality Standard (MWRES) – the inaugural report on MWRES data aiming to quantify the inequalities and discrimination experienced by BME NHS staff and develop resources to enable the NHS to recognise and address this
  8. Mend the Gap: The Independent Review into Gender Pay Gaps in Medicine in England – the report from the DHSC which looks at the gender pay gap and makes several recommendations, including for increased transparency, addressing structural barriers to women’s careers, and culture change
  9. 2021/22 priorities and operational planning guidance – setting out priorities for the year ahead following COVID-19, including supporting the health and wellbeing of staff and collaborative working to achieve goals
  10. concerns around the NHS pay deal – Nurses United requested a meeting with the health secretary earlier this year to discuss their concerns around the 3% pay rise for 2021-2022
    1. with calls from the sector for a much higher wage increase
  11. the Build Back Better Plan for Health and Social Care – reiterating the Government’s commitment to invest in the training and recruitment of NHS staff, including the delivery of 50,000 more nurses
  12. Health is everyone’s business – a government document looking at how employers can best support employees suffering from ill health and reduce ill health-related job loss
  13. NHS staff experience the busiest September on record – with major A&E departments treating 1.39 million people, ambulances responding to 76,000 life-threatening callouts, and a record 24 million GP appointments taking place over the past month
  14. NHS chief calls on people to consider lifechanging careers in NHS – as part of the We Are NHS campaign, which will showcase the range of careers within healthcare available to school leavers, graduates, or people looking for a change in career
  15. the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021 – which projects an additional £13bn will be raised by the Health & Social Care Levy, providing additional funding to develop the health workforce
  16. further funding to support the adult social care workforce – with an additional £162.5m promised to help fund workforce retention and recruitment

[Book Online]

Policy officials attending:

Our forums are known for attracting strong interest from policymakers and stakeholders. [About Us]

There’s an outline of the government departments, regulators and other interested parties who we expect to take part here.

Chairs and speakers

Keynote contributions: Dr Sanjiv Ahluwalia, Regional Postgraduate Dean, NHS Health Education London; and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor, University College London Medical School; Alastair Henderson, Chief Executive, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; Dr Vivienne Lyfar-Cissé, Chair, NHS BME Network; Dr Jenny Vaughan, Chair, The Doctors Association; and Lucy Warner, Chief Executive, NHS Practitioner Health Programme.

Speakers also confirmed: John Barwick, Chief Executive and Registrar, Health and Care Professions Council; Tracey Budding, Deputy President, Royal College of Nursing; Anita Charlesworth, Director of Research and REAL Centre, The Health Foundation; Dr Richard Fieldhouse, Chairman and Founder, National Association of Sessional GPs; Candace Miller, Executive Director, Skills for Health; Dr Andrew Tresidder, Clinical Lead for Resilience Hub, Somerset Clinical Commissioning Group; and South West Clinical Lead, NHS Practitioner Health; Luella Trickett, Director, Value and Access, Association of British Healthcare Industries; and Professor Chris Warwick, Primary Care Dean & Deputy Postgraduate Dean, NHS Health Education South East.

Chair: Baroness Thornton, Shadow Spokesperson for Health.

Further senior participants are being approached.

Attendees

Places have been reserved by officials from the National Audit Office; The Scottish Government; and the Welsh Government. Also due to attend are representatives from Care Plus Group; HEIW; NHS BME Network; Royal College of Radiologists; The Society and College of Radiographers; and University of Sheffield.

A press pass has been reserved by a representative from Nursing in Practice.

Overall, we expect further speakers and other delegates to be an informed group including Members of both Houses of Parliament, senior government officials involved in this area of public policy, together with regulators, pharmaceutical companies, representatives from the NHS, executive agencies including clinical staff, pharmacists, the independent and third sectors, patients groups, law firms, consultancies, and others affected by the issues discussed, as well as academics and think tanks, and reporters from the national and specialist media.

Booking arrangements

This is a full-scale conference taking place online***

  1. full, four-hour programme including comfort breaks – you’ll also get a full recording and transcript to refer back to
  2. information-rich discussion involving key policymakers and stakeholders
  3. conference materials provided in advance, including speaker biographies
  4. speakers presenting via webcam, accompanied by slides if they wish, using the Cisco WebEx professional online conference platform (easy for delegates – we’ll provide full details)
  5. opportunities for live delegate questions and comments with all speakers
  6. a recording of the addresses, all slides cleared by speakers, and further materials are made available to all delegates afterwards as a permanent record of the proceedings
  7. delegates are able to add their own written comments and articles following the conference, to be distributed to all attendees and more widely
  8. networking too – there will be opportunities for delegates to e-meet and interact – we’ll tell you how!
  9. video recordings – including slides – are also available to purchase

Full information and guidance on how to take part will be sent to delegates before the conference

To book places, please use the online booking form.

Once submitted, this will be taken as a confirmed booking and will be subject to the terms and conditions below.

You can also pay in advance by credit card on 01344 864796. If advance credit card payment is not possible, please let me know and we may be able to make other arrangements.

Options and charges are as follows:

  1. Access to Key issues for the health workforce and priorities going forward – funding, welfare, inclusivity, recruitment, and meeting future healthcare demand  (plus a permanent record of proceedings) is £210 plus VAT per delegate
  2. Concessionary rate places for small charities, unfunded individuals and those in similar circumstances are £95 plus VAT. Please be sure to apply for this at the time of booking.

If you find the charge for places a barrier to attending:

  1. please let me know as concessionary and complimentary places are made available in certain circumstances
  2. typical eligibility: individual service users or carers not supported by or part of an organisation, full-time students, unemployed and fully retired people with no paid work, and small charities
  3. concessions are not offered to businesses, individuals funded by an organisation, or larger charities/not-for-profit companies.

Please note terms and conditions below (including cancellation charges). [back]

For more information, and any enquiries, please contact 

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